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Alissa Baker-Oglesbee

Alissa Baker-Oglesbee

E-mail: alissa.baker-oglesbee@northwestern.edu

Alissa Baker-Oglesbee (Cherokee Nation) is a mother, wife, and doctoral student in cognitive psychology. She works with her advisor Dr. Doug Medin on a collaborative project with the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) on studying factors related success among Native American STEM scholars as well as on a collaboration with Dr. Megan Bang that evaluates how cultural models of knowledge and education affect our cognition of human-nature relations. She is also interested in how language affects how we relate to and learn about nature.  Previously a resident of Jay and Tahlequah, Oklahoma, she plans on returning home following the completion of her doctoral education to continue teaching and conducting research within the Cherokee Nation.
Sara Černe

Sara Černe

E-mail: SaraCerne2019@u.northwestern.edu

Sara Černe is a PhD candidate in the English Department focusing on 20 th /21 st -century American literature and culture. Her dissertation-in-progress traces the discourse of environmental justice in culturally diverse literature, music, and visual arts centered on the Mississippi River in the long twentieth century. She is currently researching Indigenous art and activism in the Mississippi River Valley for a Humanities Without Walls grant and serving as a Franke Graduate Fellow at Northwestern’s Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities.
Brad Dubos

Brad Dubos

E-mail: BradleyDubos2020@u.northwestern.edu

Brad Dubos is a PhD candidate in the English Department working in American poetry and culture. His dissertation investigates how Native American, African American and women poets represented the lived experience of religion from the Revolutionary period to the end of the nineteenth century. Focusing on how religious spaces functioned for—and came to matter to—Indigenous peoples, Black Americans, and women during this period, his project uncovers a proto-phenomenological undercurrent in a tradition of poets who offer a radical reimagining of the natural and social worlds constituting American space.
Bonnie Etherington

Bonnie Etherington

E-mail: BonnieEtherington2014@u.northwestern.edu

Bonnie Etherington is a PhD candidate in the English department. Her dissertation focuses on Indigenous literatures published since 1976 that represent the Pacific ocean as a "one salt water" space of trans-Indigenous histories and activism, and as a site for theorizing decolonial futures. Her recently published novel, The Earth Cries Out (Vintage NZ, 2017), is set where she grew up in West Papua and explores the ways in which ecological spaces can be sites of colonial violence but can also be spaces of decolonial potential.

E. Bennett Jones

E. Bennett Jones

E-mail: ebennettjones@u.northwestern.edu

Bennett Jones is a Ph.D. candidate in U.S. history of science, specializing in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Her dissertation, “The Indians Say: Settler Colonialism and the Scientific Study of Animals in America, 1722 to 1860,” explores the use of storytelling in early American natural history, looking at the intersections between science and settler colonialism. Bennett is also a fellow in the Science in Human Culture interdisciplinary cluster.

She holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Fiber and Material Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago as well as a Master of Arts in Museum Studies from the University of Florida and was a participant in the four-week Summer Institute of Museum Anthropology at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. While at the University of Florida, she completed a master’s thesis titled “Monarch of the Plains: Federalism and Ecology in 19th Century American Museum Habitat Groups.”

Walther Maradiegue

Walther Maradiegue

E-mail: WaltherMaradiegue2014@u.northwestern.edu

Walther Maradiegue is a Ph.D. Candidate at the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. He received his M.A. in Anthropology -with a focus in Andean Studies- from the Pontifical Catholic University of Peru in 2014. His current research focuses on indigenous literacies, ethnography of writing and history, as well as the linguistic and visual construction of indigeneity, especially thinking of the Andes during the turn from the 19th to the 20th century.

Nikki Bonne McDaid-Morgan

Nikki Bonne McDaid-Morgan

E-mail: Nikki Bonne Mcdaid-morgan <NicoleMcdaid-morgan2022@u.northwestern.edu>

Nikki (Shoshone-Bannock Tribes) is a parent, partner, and doctoral student in Learning Sciences in the School of Education and Social Policy. Her research interests are broadly focused on the informal and formal learning environments at the intersection of place-based education and Indigenous resurgence. More specifically, she wants to understand the ways that youth in land-based learning environments attribute agentic capacities and personhood to more-than-human animals and plants and how this might affect youth decision making around social and environmental concerns. She is also interested in the epistemological orientations present in children's science-focused television shows, how these might affect children's conceptions of human-nature relationships and complex relationships in ecosystems, and the implications of this for youth decision-making. Nikki earned her M.A. in Teaching from Pacific University and her B.S. in Sociology from Northeastern University. She also has experience as a middle school and high school English and Musical Theatre teacher.
Risa Puleo

Risa Puleo

Office location: Kresge Hall 4305
E-mail: RisaPuleo2022@u.northwestern.edu

Risa Puleo is a Ph.D candidate in the Department of Art History. She researches the entanglement between the Americas and Europe with a focus on how Indigenous American objects and people were collected. Her exhibition Monarchs: Brown and Native Contemporary Artists in the Path of the Butterfly, curated for Bemis Center for Contemporary Art during her year as curator-in residence, will travel through the summer of 2019 to the Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami; Blue Star Contemporary and Southwest School of Art in San Antonio; The Nerman Art Museum in Kansas City, and The Soap Factory, Minneapolis. Her exhibition will be accompanied by a catalogue published by NAME publications.

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